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Healing Hands Wellness Center

The Art and Science of Treating Seasonal or Intermittent Conditions Combining Chiropractic, Nutrition and Acupuncture Command Point Treatment.

Call Healing Hands Wellness LLC today at 952-217-9587 For Professional Acupuncture Assessment and Treatment

The following acupuncture-based information concerns treatment of intermittent or seasonal dysfunction of organs and tissues of the body. As such, needling of Command points for these conditions helps resolve several correlated undesired health concerns.

1-throat obstruction, nosebleeds, toothache, 2-inflammation of face or eye disorders, 3-organ excess or deficient function associated with cough, chills or fever, 4- heaviness in the joints and lack or organ tone and 5-disruption of the digestive system.

Five Shu or Command Points

The Five Shu/Command acupuncture points are described below as: 1-Jing Well, 2- Ying Spring, 3-Shu-Stream, 4-Jing River, and 5-He Sea. Acupuncture Shu Command Points, located on the ends of hands or feet, constitute a specific grouping points according to their fundamental seasonal and day to day healing influence. These 60 acupuncture points are most common in treatment for good reason: they get the best results.

 

Figure Showing Extremity Positions of Command Points [Ying Well Points In This Figure]

 

1-Jing Well Acupuncture Points

1- Jing Well: needling of this Shu/Command point at one end [or beginning] of a respective meridian will clear the uppermost regions of the same meridian [example: lung meridian], either through its primary or divergent branches.

1a-All twelve meridians: six yin and six yang have with Jing Well treatment points.  For the Yin meridians, Jing Well points are associated with the element Wood. Jing well points on the Yang meridians are associated with the element of Metal. Jing Well points are located either at the ends of toes or fingers. Kidney acupuncture point 1 is the exception.

1b-It may seem illogical that an acupuncture point located at the tip of a finger or toes could clear the face of swelling or stop a nosebleed. The empirical validity of this therapeutic value [distal treats proximal] has proven itself as an effective and reliable method of applying acupuncture treatment for thousands of years.

1c-The Jing Well point is where the Qi [Chee] or meridian energy ‘emanates or emerges’ on the skin from deeper levels of the body. In Winter, it is a preference to needle Jing Well acupuncture points to relieve an abnormal feeling of fullness or soreness below the heart. This point may also be needled at the appropriate time to alleviate insomnia.

2-Ying Spring Acupuncture Points

2-Ying Spring: needling of this Shu/Command point at one end [of beginning] of a meridian will also clear the uppermost regions of that respective [example: kidney], either through its primary or divergent branches.

2a-All twelve meridians, six yin and six yang have with Ying Spring treatment points.  For the Yin meridians, Ying Spring points are associated with the element Fire. Ying Spring points on the Yang meridians are associated with the element of Water. Ying Spring points are located near the ends of either toes or fingers.

2b-As with the Jing Well points, the Ying Spring as distal points on the hands and feet ‘command’ the strong action in treating excess or deficiency of qi along the whole channel; is this case the heart channel.

2c-The Ying Spring point is where the Qi [Chee] energy ‘glides’ either up or down the respective meridian. In Spring, it is a preference to needle Ying Spring acupuncture points to dispel excess heat associated with inflammation of the eyes and face. This point may also be needled at the right time to correct flushing of the face associated with weakness of the heart.

3-Shu Stream Acupuncture Points

3-Shu Stream: needling of this Shu/Command point are located either at the ventral flexure of the wrist [Yin] or the proximal to the metacarpophalangeal or metatarsophalangeal joints will also clear the uppermost regions of that respective [example: kidney], either through its primary or divergent branches. The kidney Shu Stream is again the exception to this rule being located behind the inside of the ankle joint.

3a-All twelve meridians, six yin and six yang have Shu Stream treatment points.  For the Yin meridians, Ying Spring points are associated with the element Earth. Ying Spring points on the Yang meridians are associated with the element of Wood.

3b-As with the Jing Well and Ying Spring points, the Shu Stream on the hands and feet ‘command’ the strong action in treating excess or deficiency of qi along the whole channel; is this case the Lung channel. They are the single most important acupuncture point on their own meridian to tonify their respective organ.

3c-The Shu Stream point is where the Qi [Chee] energy ‘pours’ either up or down the respective meridian. In Summer, it is a preference to needle Shu Stream acupuncture points to disperse heaviness and pain of the hands or feet. This point may also be needled when any pain generating disease of the body attacks in an ‘off and on’ or intermittent pattern.

4-Jing River Acupuncture Points

4-Jing River: needling of this Shu/Command point located either on the forearm or lower shank of the leg. Their treatment continues to relieve conditions uppermost regions of that respective [example: Large Intestine], either through its primary or divergent branches.

4a-All twelve meridians, six yin and six yang have Shu Stream treatment points.  For the Yin meridians, Ying Spring points are associated with the element Metal. Ying Spring points on the Yang meridians are associated with the element of Fire.

3b-As with the Jing Well, Ying Spring and Shu Stream points, Jing River points on the forearm or shank portion of the lower leg ‘command’ the strong action in treating excess or deficiency of qi along the whole channel; is this case the Large Intestine channel. They are the important acupuncture point for treatment of fevers and chills.

3c-The Jing River point is where the Qi [Chee] energy ‘flows’ either up or down the respective meridian. In late Summer, it is a preference to needle Shu Stream acupuncture points to expel external heat or cold influences creating difficulty in breathing.

This point may also be needled when there is soreness and stiffness of the ligaments and tendons.

5-He Sea Acupuncture Points

5-He Sea: This Shu/Command point is located near elbows and or knees. Their treatment harmonizes stomach problems related to irregular eating habits. Stimulation of these lower or upper extremity points, say on the Spleen channel, corrects conditions dysfunction of uppermost regions of that respective [example: Spleen], either through its primary or divergent branches.

5a-All twelve meridians, six yin and six yang have He Sea treatment points.  For the Yin meridians, Ying Spring points are associated with the element Water. Ying Spring points on the Yang meridians are associated with the element of Earth.

5b-As with the Jing Well, Ying Spring, Shu Stream and Jing River points, He Sea points on or near elbows and knees ‘command’ the strong action in treating excess or deficiency of qi along the whole channel; is this case the Spleen channel. They are the important acupuncture point for treatment of nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.

5c-The He Sea point is where the Qi [Chee] energy ‘descends’ into a deeper communication within the respective meridian. In late Autumn, it is a preference to needle He Sea acupuncture points to restore harmony to the digestive organs after irregular eating or drinking. He Sea points may also be used to treat skin conditions.

Seeking professional management of seasonal and or intermittent health problems with combined chiropractic and acupuncture care will restore strength and normal function adding greater quality to your home and family living.

Call: 651-699-3366 or 952-217-9587 Today.